Acute effect of Tai Chi on marker of oxidative stress and flow-mediated dilation among healthy young and elderly volunteers

Sunday, 2 December 2018

Acute effect of Tai Chi on marker of oxidative stress and flow-mediated dilation among healthy young and elderly volunteers

Nor FadilaKasim12

SarahAldred1Jet Veldhuijzenvan Zanten1
1
University of Birmingham, United Kingdom
2
Sultan Idris Education University, Malaysia

Available online 20 June 2017.

Tai Chi is an ancient exercise originated from China. The slow movements of Tai Chi are not thought to evoke an increase in heart rate above 60% HRM, and yet Tai Chi has been found to improve vascular health. We are interested in the response to a single session of Tai Chi, as a mild physical stressor. The acute response to exercise is very important as a stimulus for adaptation, but to our knowledge, no previous studies have assessed the acute response to Tai Chi. The aim of this study was to investigate the response to a single session of Tai Chi. Blood markers of oxidative stress (lipid peroxidation, antioxidant capacity) and inflammation (IL-6) were assessed along with flow-mediated dilation (FMD) in young (18-25years old) and elderly participants (65–75 years old). Participants visited the laboratory twice to undertake Tai Chi or a control visit. Blood withdrawal and FMD assessment were performed every hour, for 4 consecutive hours. Inflammation at baseline was increased in older participants, compared to young and MDA and IL-6 increased immediately after Tai Chi in both groups. Antioxidant capacity increased immediately and post one hour after Tai Chi in both groups. A single bout of Tai Chi was seen to promote cytokine release and increased antioxidant capacity, and may have a beneficial effect in improving human vasculature via these mechanisms in both old and young.