149,922 members

Skip to content. | Skip to navigation

Spokes - the NHS Cycling Network

Free range kids or a bankrupt NHS? (article from Sustrans)

 

Poll

What bicycle do you ride on, to your NHS workplace?

All about cycling..
1. Tourer
 
14% (1 votes)
2. Mountain Bike
 
0% (0 votes)
3. Racer
 
0% (0 votes)
4. Folding Bike
 
0% (0 votes)
5. Hybrid Bike
 
86% (6 votes)
6. Electric Bike
 
0% (0 votes)
7. A Trike
 
0% (0 votes)
8. recumbent bicycle
 
0% (0 votes)
9. Cargo bike
 
0% (0 votes)
10. eCargo bike
 
0% (0 votes)
11. Vintage Bike pre 1980's
 
0% (0 votes)
 

Free range kids or a bankrupt NHS? (article from Sustrans)

Concern is growing over the impact of unhealthy lifestyles on people and the economy: a shrinking economy cannot possibly continue to meet the massive healthcare costs which arise, in part, because our environments are so hostile to walking and cycling. April was a bad news month for non-communicable diseases related to physical activity deficit. The Academy of Medical Royal Colleges, representing almost all doctors in the UK, launched a six-month project to come up with a way of tackling obesity

Full Sustrans Article at this link :

http://www.sustrans.org.uk/resources/in-the-news/free-range-kids-or-a-bankrupt-nhs?dm_i=6EB,S3ZT,6A0X58,2A5EF,1

 

"Diabetes UK (DUK) launched its Impact Diabetes report, predicting that the NHS’s annual spending on diabetes in the UK will increase from £9.8 billion to £16.9 billion over the next 25 years. According to DUK Chief Executive Barbara Young, it threatens to “bankrupt the NHS”.

Obesity and type 2 diabetes, by far the commonest form, are linked. Both are related to lifestyle, and specifically to inactive and sedentary habits; both were once predominantly adult diseases but are now working their way down the age range as children’s diets deteriorate and they become less active.

So this is where the Free Range Kids campaign comes in: it’s decision time! Do we, as a society, choose to create the conditions for children to play as previous generations have always done, running around outside, getting muddy knees and developing habits of physical activity? Will we make it easy and safe for children to walk and cycle to school, getting the everyday dose of active living they need? Or will we continue to encourage more car use?

The National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence (NICE) is making it easier for local authorities to tackle the problem, with new draft walking and cycling guidance now open for consultation. Professionals in many fields, who shape the environment and can make it easier for children (and adults) to walk and cycle, can study the draft recommendations and comment on them if you wish. The consultation closes on June 19th.