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Spokes - the NHS Cycling Network

20mph default speed limit in towns (rather than 30mph)

 

Poll

What bicycle do you ride on, to your NHS workplace?

All about cycling..
1. Tourer
 
14% (1 votes)
2. Mountain Bike
 
0% (0 votes)
3. Racer
 
0% (0 votes)
4. Folding Bike
 
0% (0 votes)
5. Hybrid Bike
 
86% (6 votes)
6. Electric Bike
 
0% (0 votes)
7. A Trike
 
0% (0 votes)
8. recumbent bicycle
 
0% (0 votes)
9. Cargo bike
 
0% (0 votes)
10. eCargo bike
 
0% (0 votes)
11. Vintage Bike pre 1980's
 
0% (0 votes)
 

20mph default speed limit in towns (rather than 30mph)

Filed under:

For reasons of individual health and well being, sustainability, quality of the urban environment and of local community, it would be a good thing if more short local journeys were made by 'active travel', ie: walking or cycling. Traffic speeds currently put many people off this as a practical proposition.

For reasons of individual health and well being, sustainability, quality of the urban environment and of local community, it would be a good thing if more short local journeys were made by 'active travel', ie: walking or cycling. Traffic speeds currently put many people off this as a practical proposition.

A 20mph default speed limit in towns (rather than 30mph), with sensible signposted exceptions, would be a good way to reassure people that it was safe to use cycling as an practical means of transport.

To this effect, I wonder if any users of this forum would be prepared to sign the petition I have had accepted on the Downing street web site. The petition is as follows:

'We the undersigned petition the Prime Minister to Restore the balance between traffic and people by making 20mph the default speed limit in towns to remove traffic threats to pedestrians and cyclists, children and the elderly.'

The link to this is as follows:

http://petitions.number10.gov.uk/Rebalance/

Further notes on the petition read as follows:
A 20mph speed default speed limit in towns would improve safety, quality of life, urban environment and health by encouraging more active travel, particularly by children. It would make town streets less treatening to vulnerable pedestrians and improve community. It would help counter obesity, reduce carbon emissions and improve our record of pedestrian casualties by encouraging less car use for short journeys including the school run.

Overall I believe this could be a civilizing influence in our towns and cities.

Thank you for taking the time to read this. If you agree please sign the petition and if possible encourage others to do so.

Regards,

Stephen Peterson
Filed under: