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NLP in Healthcare

Clinical hypnotherapy in the NHS

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relaxation sessions could be so much more

Up to Clinical hypnotherapy in the NHS
March 17. 2011
mark peters

do you run relaxation sessions?

do patients say "they're great but I can't do it at home"?

do you understand the process of timelines and anchors?

What are the values of metaphor?

The wonderful thing about relaxation sessions si that they are a state changing process and therefore require sensory imformation to create the desired state. To to this effectively and then anchor it in makes it more repeatable, plus testable.

What would be helpful for you to be able gain better results and add more benefit?

May 04. 2011
David Gebbie

Hi Mark

I am currently studying a Clinical Hypnotherapy course. I asked for some study leave to complete case studies and essays and was informed that "it was seen as a complimentary therapy and not relevant to the clinical area". I work in a substance misuse service, much of the work is around changing habits and learning to cope with the stresses of life without using illicit drugs.  Hypnotherapy is an excellent therapeutic modality for these types of problems. I have carried out some basic relaxation and visualisation exercises with clients and have some great feedback. It can be difficult to find a quiet area and time to do this work.

I think a more informed, positive attitude and a recognition of the potency of these interventions would be an excellent starting point.Also, provision of adequate facilities would be a benefit to the development of this therapy.

 

regards

 

David

 

May 17. 2011
mark peters

considering the majority of illness presenting at GP surgeries is emotionally induced illness it amazes me that more are not refered for NLP and Hypnotherapy. The favoured tool of CBT now tends to include work on Mindfulness and guided imagery; anything to avoid trance states are being used.

I see many clients for substance abuse and addictive behaviours; changing their 'groundhog day processing' enables them to take charge again rather than blame everything and everyone else.... Maybe reframing the addiction cycle to to a process that can end would be worth considering again.

People are busy hypnotising themselves into negative states all the time; why not teach them to be more effective with the skill?

 

Previously David Gebbie wrote:

Hi Mark

I am currently studying a Clinical Hypnotherapy course. I asked for some study leave to complete case studies and essays and was informed that "it was seen as a complimentary therapy and not relevant to the clinical area". I work in a substance misuse service, much of the work is around changing habits and learning to cope with the stresses of life without using illicit drugs.  Hypnotherapy is an excellent therapeutic modality for these types of problems. I have carried out some basic relaxation and visualisation exercises with clients and have some great feedback. It can be difficult to find a quiet area and time to do this work.

I think a more informed, positive attitude and a recognition of the potency of these interventions would be an excellent starting point.Also, provision of adequate facilities would be a benefit to the development of this therapy.

 

regards

 

David

 

 

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