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Partnership agreements, mergers and premises: Avoiding disputes for GP practices

 

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Partnership agreements, mergers and premises: Avoiding disputes for GP practices

What
When Oct 30, 2019 from 10:00 AM to 03:30 PM
Where London
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Whether practices are working at scale or simply keen to avoid messy disputes, a partnership agreement can provide essential protection.

Although GP partnerships are commonplace in general practice, a partnership is not a separate legal entity in English law, but simply a collective term for the individual rights and liabilities of each of the partners.

A partnership agreement – sometimes called a partnership deed – can clarify the rights and responsibilities of the individual partners and reduce the risk of distress or disruption to the business when circumstances change.

Yet most GP practices in England currently do not have a deed in place, but will need to fall back on antiquated legislation – the Partnership Act of 1890.

At this event, Daniel Kirk and Puja Solanki, healthcare specialist lawyers with Capsticks, explain why every practice should have a partnership deed, the options available and what protection they provide. Daniel specialises in resolving GP partnership disputes. Puja's main areas of expertise are partnership deeds, partnership formation and GP mergers. 

The policy drive for primary care networks (PCNs) means that all practices are now under pressure to work at scale. PCNs are likely to prompt many practices to rethink their commercial and legal arrangements and one likely outcome will be an increase in mergers.

The event will give delegates a clear understanding of the difference between a merger and an acquisition and the issues surrounding premises – disputes about property are among the most common reasons for partners to fall out.
Delegates will leave with a clear understanding of the need for a partnership deed and the risks of relying on a partnership at will – an arrangement that can be dissolved at any time with no liability by any of the partners.

They will also learn about the different causes of disputes, how to avoid them and, when disputes arise, how to resolve them as swiftly and painlessly as possible.

This event is essential for GP partners and practice business managers. It will also be of interest to primary care commissioners who need to be assured that the practices in their area are stable and sustainable.

More information about this event…