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Majority of hospitals fail to adopt green IT to help reduce their carbon footprint shows BridgeHead survey

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Majority of hospitals fail to adopt green IT to help reduce their carbon footprint shows BridgeHead survey

Majority of hospitals fail to adopt green IT to help reduce their carbon footprint shows BridgeHead survey

Are the NHS failing to recognise the benefits of Green IT

The majority of hospitals are failing to adopt green IT to help reduce their carbon footprints, shows research from healthcare storage virtualisation firm BridgeHead. 

An extensive online survey of hospitals worldwide - the "BridgeHead Software Data Management Healthcheck 2010" -  has shown that only 25% of hospitals surveyed had a specific CO2 reduction target. The vast majority of respondents were from the UK and the US.

In addition, only 16% of the healthcare IT professionals questioned said they monitored energy consumption across their IT infrastructures on an ongoing basis against pre-set targets. Less than 3% claimed to use any sort of carbon offset scheme.

In the UK, the National Health Service's Carbon Reduction Strategy for England mandates that the NHS must reduce its existing carbon footprint by 80% by 2050 to help meet government CO2 targets. To stay on-track for this target, BridgeHead said the NHS must reduce carbon emissions by 10% by 2015 (based on a 2007 baseline).

"Prior to the recession, 'green IT' was definitely en vogue. Yet the survey results suggest a shift in priorities, namely that green IT is not a primary focus for healthcare IT professionals at the moment," said John McCann, director of marketing at BridgeHead Software.

McCann said healthcare storage virtualisation is best known for its technological benefits - like simplifying data migration, enhancing content access, and maximising storage resource usage - but he said it also offers “green merit as a secondary benefit” by helping to alleviate the burden of healthcare data being kept 'powered-on' in the primary store.

Nearly 40% of respondents said they were employing server and/or storage virtualisation to minimise the number of physical servers in use and maximise the efficiency of their existing storage assets.

Source: Document Management News